Stats, Food Journals, and General Update

by Christine on April 23rd, 2010

filed under Christine's Life Updates, Diet, Food, Nutrition, General Information

Happy Friday everyone! It’s the end of the week, I’m only working a half a day today, the Grateful Dead is on, and I’m drinking some Mountain Dew. Cheers!

This week ended my 6 week stint taking a bootcamp exercise class. Although the 5 a.m. hour didn’t mesh well with my physiology, the exercise did. My final stats are in:

Weight: Lost 4 pounds
Size: Stayed the same (size 10)
Neck: Lost 0.25 inches (Currently 13.0 inches)
Arm: Lost 0.75 inches (Currently 11.75)
Chest: Lost 1.5 inches!!! (Currently 37.25)
Waist: Lost 0.5 inches (Currently 31.25)
Hip: Lost 1.5 inches!!! (Currently 40.0)
Thigh: Lost 1.0 inches! (Currently 24.5)

I’ve been keeping a daily food journal for the last 10 years or so. However, for bootcamp, I had to submit my food journal weekly to the instructor. I thought I would offer up my food journal for you all to look at. Not all the days exemplified stellar eating, but it’s a realistic look at what I’ve eaten to lose 4 pounds of weight and 5.5 inches around my body. A word of warning: there are some pictures of somewhat-naked men in these. I like to add photos just to spice things up a bit. I’ll probably add photos of pretty women at some point, too, if I continue making these into PDFs.

PDF Screenshot

The following are PDFs for download:

Week 1: March 15, 2010PDF icon

Week 2: March 22, 2010
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Week 3: March 29, 2010
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Week 4: April 5, 2010 PDF icon

Week 5: April 13, 2010
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If you’re astute, you’ll note a few common patterns in my diet:

  • My calories are low, and I exercise frequently.
  • I eat whatever I want. Chocolate, cosmos, cheese, you name it.  I could do better with my food choices overall, but eating something crappy once a day doesn’t typically get me into trouble because I only eat about 100 calories worth of crap food at any given time.
  • I consume plenty of protein.
  • I eat all the freaking time, usually a little bit of food every 2 hours.  I never eat a “big” meal. (I can’t with the band)

Please let me know if you find these files to be helpful to you. If they are, I’ll take the time to add more weekly food journals for download.

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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

by Christine on April 21st, 2010

filed under Exercise, General Information

What are DOMS?

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is that achy, sore feeling you get the day after a strenuous workout.  The cause of DOMS is actually unknown, but scientists think that they are caused by a breakdown of muscle fibers; this is particularly true when one is doing weight-training exercises.  Other research claims that the soreness comes not from the damage process but from the rebuilding process.  Either way, the exact cause is unknown.

DOMS is most common for those beginning an exercise program or working new muscle groups.  For example, someone new to doing situps will experience DOMS the next day while someone experienced at situps will not unless he or she over-trains.

You don’t have to get DOMS in order to get an effective workout. Highly-trained athletes rarely get DOMS because they are in such good condition. However, I personally see the DOMS as an indication that I did indeed get a workout. It’s like somewhat-instant gratification – your body says “YES! You kicked my butt! Way to go!” Perhaps that’s just an aspect of my “no pain, no gain” personality.  I get DOMS most often when I lift weights “to failure,” when I climb a LOT of stairs, or do a ton of squats/lunges.  Most body-building forums that I have read seem to seek DOMS out like a special prize. However, at least one article I read said that DOMS can be an indication of poor form and should NOT be sought after.  I’m a little unclear about the safety of DOMS, but they haven’t killed me yet.

In reading up about DOMS, I came across articles about eccentric muscle contractions and concentric muscle contractions. Apparently eccentric muscle contractions can lead to bigger (and better) DOMS. I didn’t know anything about these terms and wanted to delve into further study, primarily so I can figure out to have more DOMS after my workouts!

Eccentric Muscle Contractions

Eccentric muscle contractions are an overall lengthening of muscles as it develops tension and contracts to control motion performed by an outside force.  Muscles suffer greater damage when you employ eccentric muscle contractions than the opposite (concentric muscle contractions). An example of an eccentric bicep contraction would be a reverse bicep curl, or the act of setting a heavy object down gently.  Other exercises include going down stairs, running downhill, the downward motion of squats, pushups or pull-ups.

Concentric Muscle Contractions

Concentric muscle contractions are a shortening of the muscle as it develops tension and contracts to move a resistance. An example of a concentric bicep contraction would be a bicep curl, squat, or pull=-up. Running up-hill or climbing stairs causes the quadriceps to contract.  These are most common types of muscle contractions used in a gym when lifting weights but do not often generate the bigger DOMS.

Treating DOMS

There are no proven methods for getting rid of DOMS once they have come around.  You primarily need to let them run their course. However, some home-remedies for making the DOMS less severe include:

  • Taking an ice bath
  • Stretching
  • Using the RICE method of treating injuries
  • Eat protein-rich foods 30 minutes following the exercise

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Institute pushes FDA to limit sodium in foods

by Christine on April 20th, 2010

filed under Diet, Food, Nutrition, General Information

On Tuesday, April 20, 2010 the government’s Institute of Medicine called for the federal government to regulate how much sodium (salt) is found in processed foods and in restaurants. Currently, sodium is not regulated by the FDA; in fact, companies can put in as much sodium as they want. Sodium falls under the category of spices and additives that are “generally recognized as safe.”

Leading health authorities, such as the 4th edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (1995) recommends 2,400 mg of sodium per day, and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends no more than 1,500mg per day.  However, most Americans consume 3,436 mg per day, according to a CDC on study. Another source says that most Americans consume 3,900 mg per day – either way, the levels are way too high.

How high are the sodium levels? Check out how many of your favorite foods have:

  • Red Lobster’s Admiral’s Feast: 4,400 mg
  • Oliver Garden’s Chicken Parmigiana: 3,380 mg
  • McDonald’s Happy Meal with Cheeseburger: 1,040 mg
  • Lean Cuisine’s Café Classics, Chicken Marsala, 620 mg per package
  • Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, family size, 580 mg per serving
  • Lean Cuisine’s Pesto Chicken and Bow Tie Pasta, 550 mg per package
  • Campbell’s Select Harvest Healthy Request Chicken and Rice soup: 480 mg per serving
  • Nabisco Wheat Thins, original, 230 mg per serving
  • Slim Fast, Creamy Milk Chocolate, 220 mg per can
  • Kashi TLC Chrewy Honey Almond Flax Granola Bar, 115 mg

Approximately 75% of dietary sodium is added to processed foods, and only 20% is added by people like you and me adding salt at the dining room table.

The consequences of too much sodium can be life-changing for some. Sodium has been recognized to contribute to high blood pressure, hypertension, and strokes.

Today the FDA responded by saying that the government agency is going to establish a group to review options and next steps. We all know what that means; it’ll take years before any steps are taken to regulate the amount of salt intake in processed foods. Plus, with agencies like the Salt Institute lobbying to keep legislation from happening, it looks like we’re on our own to educate ourselves and choose healthy choices.

What do you think about this news? Should the government regulate sodium levels or no? Respond below!

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10 Things to Make Any Meal Healthier

by Christine on April 19th, 2010

filed under General Information

Here are a few tips I’ve put together to help you make meals a little healthier:

  1. 30 minutes prior to eating, chug a HUGE glass of room-temperature water.
  2. While eating, do not drink anything! (Drinking liquid pushes your food through your stomach faster, which leaves you feeling hungrier sooner after a meal.) Do not drink for at least an hour after you are done eating.
  3. Look for recipes that replace butter and shortening with applesauce. (You can do this with cookies and many desserts!)
  4. Add a small salad to your meal. Eat the salad first before you eat any other food. That way you ensure that you get your veggies in!
  5. Grill or learn to broil. Put away the deep fryer for good,and avoid pan-cooking your food whenever you can.
  6. One of my favorite salad dressings is: 1 dash red wine vinegar, 1 dash lemon juice, 1 dash salt, 3 dashes of dill. This salad dressing has zero calories, versus what could be up to 200+ calories in a traditional salad dressing.  You can also use salsa as a salad dressing as a low-calorie alternative.
  7. For dessert, have fresh fruit with low-fat cool whip on top or a dash of splenda.
  8. If you are craving chocolate, keep a bag of semi-sweetened chocolate chips in your refrigerator (or dark chocolate chunks)…the kind that you find in the baking isle. One or two tiny chocolate chips may curb your chocolate cravings without tipping over the scale in a really bad way.
  9. Weigh EVERYTHING.  Measure it. Weight it. Write it down.
  10. Drink more water. See tip #1.  I know I’m repeating, but this really is the best tip and it’s worth repeating. Try it steadfastly for a week and you’ll tell that it works!
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200 snacks for under 100 calories!

by Christine on April 18th, 2010

filed under Diet, Food, Nutrition, General Information

Bread, Cereal, Pasta, Rice, and Snack Foods

Breads

Bagel, plain 1/2 medium (1 oz.) – 75
Bread, white 1 slice – 80
Bread, wheat 1 slice – 80
Bread, light 1 slice – 40
Breadsticks, soft 1/2 (1 oz.) – 75
Cornbread 1/2 piece (1 oz.) – 95
English muffin 1/2 medium – 68
Melba toast 4 – 80
Muffin, blueberry 1/2 (1 oz.) – 80
Muffin, bran 1/2 (1 oz.) – 80
Muffin, corn 1/2 (1 oz.) – 88
Popovers 1/2 (1 oz.) – 65

Cereals, cooked

Grits, cooked 1/2 cup – 70
Oatmeal, cooked 1/2 cup – 75

Cereals, ready to eat

Granola, low-fat 1/4 cup – 95
Oat cereal, toasted 1/2 cup – 55
Puffed rice 1 cup – 50
Raisin Bran 1/4 cup – 50

Crackers

Animal crackers, plain 6 – 85
Animal crackers, iced 3 – 75
Graham crackers 1 sheet – 55
Matzoh 1/2 sheet – 55
Oyster crackers 23 – 60
Saltines 5 – 60

Snack Foods

Snack cracker, butter 5 – 80
Popcorn, air popped 3 cups – 90
Popcorn, microwave 1.5 cups – 55
Popcorn, microwave light 3 cups – 60
Popcorn, oil popped 1 cup – 55
Popcorn, caramel 1/2 cup – 75
Popcorn, cheese 1 cup – 64
Potato chips, baked 5 – 60
Potato chips, regular 10 – 75
Pretzels, twists 4 large – 55
Pretzels, twists 8 small – 55
Tortilla chips, baked 10 bite size – 55
Tortilla chips, regular 6 rounds- 75
Tortilla chips, regular 3 restaurant style – 68

Fruits and Vegetables

Juices

Apple juice or cider 1/2 cup – 60
Apricot nectar 1/2 cup – 70
Cranberry juice cocktail, regular 1/2 cup – 73
Cranberry juice cocktail, reduced-calorie 1 cup – 45
Grape juice 1/2 cup – 75
Grapefruit juice 1 cup – 95
Lemon juice 2 Tbsp. – 10
Lime juice 2 Tbsp. – 10
Orange juice 1/2 cup – 55
Pineapple juice 1/2 cup – 70
Prune juice 1/2 cup – 90
Tomato juice 1 cup – 50
Vegetable juice 1 cup – 50

Fruits

Apple 1 medium – 80
Applesauce, sweetened 1/4 cup – 50
Applesauce, unsweetened 1/2 cup – 50
Apricots, dried 4 halves – 40
Apricots, fresh 1 medium – 20
Avocado 1/4 medium – 80
Banana 1/2 medium – 55
Blackberries 1 cup – 75
Blueberries 1 cup – 80
Cantaloupe 1 cup – 55
Cherries, maraschino 1 medium – 10
Cherries, sour fresh 1/2 cup – 40
Cherries, sweet fresh 1/2 cup – 60
Cranberries, fresh 1/2 cup – 25
Fruit cocktail, canned in light syrup 1/2 cup – 70
Grapefruit 1/2 medium – 40
Grapes 17 medium – 60
Honeydew melon 1 cup – 60
Kiwi 1 medium – 45
Mandarin oranges, canned 1/2 cup – 50
Mango 1/2 medium – 65
Mixed dried fruit 1/4 cup – 85
Nectarine 1 medium – 65
Orange 1 medium – 60
Papaya 1/2 medium – 60
Peach 1 medium – 40
Pear 1/2 medium – 50
Pineapple, fresh 1 cup – 75
Pineapple, canned in light syrup 1/2 cup – 65
Plums, fresh 1 medium – 35
Plums, dried (prunes) 3 medium – 60
Raspberries 1 cup – 60
Strawberries 1 cup – 50
Tangerine 1 medium – 35
Watermelon 1 medium – 50

Vegetables

Carrots, cooked 1/2 cup – 35
Carrots, raw 1 large – 30
Celery, raw 1 stalk – 5
Cucumber, raw 1/2 medium – 20
Lettuce, raw 1 cup – 5
Potato, baked 1 (2 oz.) – 65
Potatoes, mashed w/milk and butter 1/2 cup – 100
Tomato, raw 1 medium – 25

Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese, and Frozen Desserts

Milk

Whole milk 1/2 cup – 75
Reduced-fat milk (2%) 1/2 cup – 60
Low-fat milk (1%) 1/2 cup – 50
Fat-free milk 1 cup – 90
Buttermilk, low-fat 1/2 cup – 55
Chocolate milk, fat-free 1/2 cup – 73
Rice beverage, plain 1/2 cup – 60
Soy beverage, plain 1/2 cup – 50

Yogurt

Whole milk yogurt, plain 1/2 cup – 90
Low-fat yogurt, plain 1/2 cup – 55
Fat-free yogurt, plain 1/2 cup – 50
Low-fat yogurt, flavored 1/4 cup – 58
Fat-free yogurt, flavored and artificially sweetened 1/2 cup – 50

Cheese

Cheese, regular (full-fat) 1/2 oz. – 55
Cheese, reduced-fat 1 oz. – 80
Cheese, fat-free 1 oz. – 40
Cottage cheese, 2% 1/4 cup – 50
Cottage cheese, fat-free 1/2 cup – 80
Cream cheese, regular 1 Tbsp. – 50
Cream cheese, reduced-fat 2 Tbsp. – 70
Cream cheese, fat-free 2 Tbsp. – 30
Feta cheese 1 oz. – 80
Mozzarella cheese, part-skim 1 oz. – 80
Ricotta cheese, low-fat 1/4 cup – 70
String cheese 1 oz. – 70

Frozen desserts

Frozen yogurt, regular 1/4 cup – 60
Frozen yogurt, fat-free 1/2 cup – 95
Ice cream, regular 1/4 cup – 70
Ice cream, reduced-fat 1/4 cup – 50
Ice cream, fat-free 1/2 cup – 90
Ice cream, fat-free with no added sugar 1/2 cup – 70
Sherbet 1/4 cup – 65
Sorbet 1/4 cup – 55

Processed and Deli Meats, Fish and Seafood

Processed and Deli Meats

Bacon, fried 1 slice – 35
Beef jerky 1 oz. – 90
Bologna 1 oz. – 90
Canadian bacon 1 oz. – 45
Pepperoni 1/2 oz. – 70
Roast beef, deli 1 oz. – 30
Sausage, smoked 1 oz. – 95

Poultry

Chicken breast with skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 85
Chicken breast without skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 70
Chicken breast, deli 1 oz. – 45
Chicken thighs with skin 1 oz. cooked – 70
Chicken thighs without skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 84
Chicken wings, roasted 1/2 – 50
Turkey breast, deli 1 oz. – 30
Turkey, dark meat with skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 94
Turkey, dark meat without skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 80
Turkey, light meat with skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 70
Turkey, light meat without skin 1.5 oz. cooked – 60
Ground turkey, lean 1.5 oz. cooked – 85
Ground turkey, extra-lean 1.5 oz. cooked – 60

Fish and Seafood

Catfish 1.5 oz. cooked – 65
Clams 6 large – 90
Cod 3 oz. cooked – 90
Crab, blue fresh 3 oz. cooked – 90
Crab, blue canned 1/2 cup – 70
Crab, imitation 3 oz. – 90
Halibut, Atlantic 1.5 oz. cooked – 60
Lobster 1.5 oz. cooked – 55
Mussels 1.5 oz. cooked – 73
Orange roughy 3 oz. cooked – 75
Oysters 6 – 65
Salmon, Atlantic fresh 1.5 oz. cooked – 78
Salmon, smoked 1.5 oz. – 50
Scallops, bay 1.5 oz. cooked – 60
Scallops, sea 3 large – 60
Tuna, yellowfin fresh 1.5 oz. cooked – 60
Tuna, canned in water 1/4 cup – 60

Eggs, Nuts and Seeds, Sugars and Sweets, Alcoholic and Other Beverages

Eggs

Egg 1 large – 75
Egg white 1 – 15
Egg yolk 1 – 60
Egg substitute 1/4 cup – 30

Nuts and Seeds

Almonds 12 – 84
Cashews 9 – 83
Flax seeds 2 Tbsp. – 95
Peanut butter 1 Tbsp. – 95
Peanuts, dry roasted 20 – 80
Peanuts, oil roasted 20 – 85
Pecans 15 – 80
Poppy seeds 1 Tbsp. – 50
Pumpkin seeds 2 Tbsp. – 95
Sunflower seeds 1 Tbsp. – 50

Sugars and Sweets

Chocolate syrup 1 Tbsp. – 50
Honey 1 tsp. – 20
Jam/jelly 1 Tbsp. – 50
Maple syrup 1 Tbsp. – 50
Pancake syrup, regular 1 Tbsp. – 55
Pancake syrup, reduced-calorie 1 Tbsp. – 25
Sugar, white or brown 1 tsp. – 15

Alcoholic and other Beverages

Alcoholic beverages

Beer, regular 6 fl. oz. – 73
Beer, light 6 fl. oz. – 50
Bloody Mary 4 fl. oz. – 93
Liqueurs, 54 proof 1/2 fl. oz. – 58
Daiquiri 1 fl. oz. – 56
Gin, rum, vodka, whiskey, 80 proof 4 fl. oz. – 65
Sherry, dry 4 fl. oz. – 80
Wine, dry red, white, or blush 2 fl. oz. – 85
Wine, sweet dessert 4 fl. oz. – 90
Wine cooler 8 fl. oz. – 72

Other beverages

Café latte, with fat-free milk 8 fl. oz. – 80
Cappuccino, with fat-free milk 8 fl. oz. – 55
Club soda 8 fl. oz. – 0
Coffee, brewed 6 fl. oz. – 5
Hot cocoa mix, with water 4 fl. oz. – 60
Tonic water 8 fl. oz. – 85
Soda, diet 12 fl. oz. – 0
Soda, regular 6 fl. oz. – 73
Tea, brewed 6 fl. oz. – 5
Tea, sweetened iced 8 fl. oz. – 90
Water 8 fl. oz – 0

Content courtesy of www.bhg.com.

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